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“The President’s Own”

 

“The President’s Own”

United States Marine Band

Lieutenant Colonel Jason K. Fettig, Director
Marine Band Photo Gallery
On July 13, 2017, a Marine Jazz Combo performed at the National Museum of American History's Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza as part of the Star-Spangled American Music Series. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On July 13, 2017, a Marine Jazz Combo performed at the National Museum of American History's Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza as part of the Star-Spangled American Music Series. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On July 13, 2017, a Marine Jazz Combo performed at the National Museum of American History's Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza as part of the Star-Spangled American Music Series. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On July 13, 2017, a Marine Jazz Combo performed at the National Museum of American History's Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza as part of the Star-Spangled American Music Series. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On July 13, 2017, a Marine Jazz Combo performed at the National Museum of American History's Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza as part of the Star-Spangled American Music Series. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, members of the Marine Band supported a wreath-laying ceremony in honor of the Marines who fought in the Korean War. President Moon Jae-in of the Republic of Korea honored the Marines at the Korean War Chosin Monument at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. In 1950, President Moon's parents were able to flee to South Korea after the 1st Marine Division drove the enemy back. Today, he showed his gratitude for all the Marine Corps did for his family. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, members of the Marine Band supported a wreath-laying ceremony in honor of the Marines who fought in the Korean War. President Moon Jae-in of the Republic of Korea honored the Marines at the Korean War Chosin Monument at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. In 1950, President Moon's parents were able to flee to South Korea after the 1st Marine Division drove the enemy back. Today, he showed his gratitude for all the Marine Corps did for his family. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, members of the Marine Band supported a wreath-laying ceremony in honor of the Marines who fought in the Korean War. President Moon Jae-in of the Republic of Korea honored the Marines at the Korean War Chosin Monument at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. In 1950, President Moon's parents were able to flee to South Korea after the 1st Marine Division drove the enemy back. Today, he showed his gratitude for all the Marine Corps did for his family. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, members of the Marine Band supported a wreath-laying ceremony in honor of the Marines who fought in the Korean War. President Moon Jae-in of the Republic of Korea honored the Marines at the Korean War Chosin Monument at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. In 1950, President Moon's parents were able to flee to South Korea after the 1st Marine Division drove the enemy back. Today, he showed his gratitude for all the Marine Corps did for his family. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, members of the Marine Band supported a wreath-laying ceremony in honor of the Marines who fought in the Korean War. President Moon Jae-in of the Republic of Korea honored the Marines at the Korean War Chosin Monument at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. In 1950, President Moon's parents were able to flee to South Korea after the 1st Marine Division drove the enemy back. Today, he showed his gratitude for all the Marine Corps did for his family. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, members of the Marine Band supported a wreath-laying ceremony in honor of the Marines who fought in the Korean War. President Moon Jae-in of the Republic of Korea honored the Marines at the Korean War Chosin Monument at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. In 1950, President Moon's parents were able to flee to South Korea after the 1st Marine Division drove the enemy back. Today, he showed his gratitude for all the Marine Corps did for his family. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On June 17, 2017, the Marine Chamber Orchestra performed Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons and Max Richter's The Four Seasons Recomposed at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Center and Concert Hall in Alexandria, Va. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On June 17, 2017, the Marine Chamber Orchestra performed Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons and Max Richter's The Four Seasons Recomposed at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Center and Concert Hall in Alexandria, Va. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On June 17, 2017, the Marine Chamber Orchestra performed Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons and Max Richter's The Four Seasons Recomposed at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Center and Concert Hall in Alexandria, Va. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On June 17, 2017, the Marine Chamber Orchestra performed Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons and Max Richter's The Four Seasons Recomposed at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Center and Concert Hall in Alexandria, Va. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On June 17, 2017, the Marine Chamber Orchestra performed Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons and Max Richter's The Four Seasons Recomposed at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Center and Concert Hall in Alexandria, Va. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Amanda Simmons/released)
On June 14, 2017, the Marine Band participated in the funeral for World War II casualty Pfc. Larry R. Roberts, USMC. In November 1943, Roberts was assigned to Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Roberts died Nov. 25, 1943. Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan. In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015. Roberts' remains were returned to the United States and buried at Arlington National Cemetery with military honors. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On June 14, 2017, the Marine Band participated in the funeral for World War II casualty Pfc. Larry R. Roberts, USMC. In November 1943, Roberts was assigned to Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Roberts died Nov. 25, 1943. Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan. In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015. Roberts' remains were returned to the United States and buried at Arlington National Cemetery with military honors. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On June 14, 2017, the Marine Band participated in the funeral for World War II casualty Pfc. Larry R. Roberts, USMC. In November 1943, Roberts was assigned to Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Roberts died Nov. 25, 1943. Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan. In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015. Roberts' remains were returned to the United States and buried at Arlington National Cemetery with military honors. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)
On June 14, 2017, the Marine Band participated in the funeral for World War II casualty Pfc. Larry R. Roberts, USMC. In November 1943, Roberts was assigned to Special Weapons Group, 2nd Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Roberts died Nov. 25, 1943. Despite the heavy casualties suffered by U.S. forces, military success in the battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan. In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015. Roberts' remains were returned to the United States and buried at Arlington National Cemetery with military honors. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rachel Ghadiali/released)